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Antibiotic resistance on Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae from suspected Urinary Tract Infection in tertiary hospital: one and half-year laboratory-based surveillance

Antibiotic resistance on Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae from suspected Urinary Tract Infection in tertiary hospital: one and half-year laboratory-based surveillance

World Health Organization (WHO) has called antibiotic resistance as an emerging disease. Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common disease and major cause of morbidity in hospital and/or community, related with antibiotic resistance; about 75%-90% of the disease is caused by Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The rapid spread of bacteria resistance to antibiotic competes with new drugs development.

The aim of study is to evaluate the antibiotic resistance for E. coli and K. pneumoniae to improve rational antibiotic usage. This is a laboratory-based surveillance study. All cultured urine with suspected UTI (community and hospitalized) on tertiary hospital in Bandung is collected from January 2012 to June 2013. Bacteria are identified and tested for antibiotic susceptibility pattern according to CLSI guidelines. From 2173 positive culture, 1017 isolates (45.89%) was E. coli, 317 isolates (14.4%) was K. pneumoniae and 839 isolates (38.6%) was mixed bacteria. The antibiotic susceptibility pattern shows high resistance to quinolone and penicillin group (>60%), increasing resistance to cephem group; only aminoglycoside and carbapenem group are susceptible antibiotic (>95%). Highly antibiotic resistance for E. coli and K. pneumoniae encourage a novel, fast-surveillance model for reporting antibiotic resistance to improve the rational antibiotic usage.